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Saturday, January 1, 2011

Book Review - American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt by Daniel Rasmussen













Title: American Uprising: The Untold Story of America's Largest Slave Revolt
Author: Daniel Rasmussen
Year: 2011
Page: 288
Genre: Non-Fiction - History

New to me author? Yes
Read this author again? Not sure
Tearjerker? No
Where did it take place? US
FTC Disclosure: Free ARC from HarperCollins

Summary (from goodreads.com):
A gripping and deeply revealing history of an infamous slave rebellion that nearly toppled New Orleans and changed the course of American history

In January 1811, five hundred slaves, dressed in military uniforms and armed with guns, cane knives, and axes, rose up from the plantations around New Orleans and set out to conquer the city. Ethnically diverse, politically astute, and highly organized, this self-made army challenged not only the economic system of plantation agriculture but also American expansion. Their march represented the largest act of armed resistance against slavery in the history of the United States.

American Uprising is the riveting and long-neglected story of this elaborate plot, the rebel army's dramatic march on the city, and its shocking conclusion. No North American slave uprising—not Gabriel Prosser's, not Denmark Vesey's, not Nat Turner's—has rivaled the scale of this rebellion either in terms of the number of the slaves involved or the number who were killed. More than one hundred slaves were slaughtered by federal troops and French planters, who then sought to write the event out of history and prevent the spread of the slaves' revolutionary philosophy. With the Haitian revolution a recent memory and the War of 1812 looming on the horizon, the revolt had epic consequences for America.

Through groundbreaking original research, Daniel Rasmussen offers a window into the young, expansionist country, illuminating the early history of New Orleans and providing new insight into the path to the Civil War and the slave revolutionaries who fought and died for justice and the hope of freedom.


First Sentence:
In 1811, a group of around 500 enslaved men dressed in military uniforms and armed with guns, cane knives, and axes rose up from the slave plantations around New Orleans and set out to conquer the city.

 
Why did I pick this book?
When HarperCollins asked if I wish to review some of their January 2011 titles, this one caught my eye as I wish to learn more about the history of slavery.


My thoughts:
  • After I read The Help, I wish to learn more about slavery and its history in the US. While I don't typically read history books, I thought this may be a good book to start as I remember reading a blurb about "it read like a fiction" 
  • I am afraid though I couldn't finish the book... I just couldn't get into it and got bored :( 
  • Since history usually is not my genre, I think I'd stick to historical fiction instead if I want to learn a little more about history (I know, fiction is not 100% accurate... but at least it may spark my interest into learning more...)
  • I think I'd pass this ARC onto someone else who may be more interested in this genre, rather than have it sitting on my shelve and go to waste. I think next time I'd be more careful in choosing ARC - to be fair to the author. Lessons learned. 
  • This book will be out on Jan 4, 2011.


       
      Overall Rating: 0 Stars. Did Not Finish.



       
      Have you read this book? 
      If you have, I would love to hear what you think! I'll link your review here if you wish!


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